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Assess the Credibility of Your Resources

Imagine that you want to give a talk about the importance of developing and maintaining a good financial credit history. There are any number of resources available to you. Banks, stores, even universities offer credit cards that enable one to go into debt. Doubtlessly, family and friends maintain credit cards so can give you suggestions. Your task as a researcher is to determine which of resources are the most credible.

Which of the following would most likely be reliable, objective, and expert?

Well, it’s possible that you’d get good advice from a friendly banker. And you might be advised about what not to do by a cousin in financial trouble. But at the Nellie Mae site you’re able to read practical tips aimed at a student audience, prepared by a well-known financial institution. You can learn how card companies target students, why we want credit cards, how they’re billed, the pitfalls of owning them, and how to recover after mistakes.

Click here to investigate the credibility of resources.

Is that story going around the Internet fact or fiction? Find out whether this story is true or false: "This email includes several pictures of Jacqueline Saburido, a pretty girl who, according to the eRumor, was in a vehicle struck by a drunk driver in 1999 and was burned beyond recognition." Find out by going to http://www.truthorfiction.com/ . Menu also offers specialized sections such as “Anatomy of a Rumor” as well as categories to search for rumors regarding health, education, food and drink, celebrities, etc.

Would you like to learn more about computer hoaxes? Check out Hoaxbusters at the U.S. Department of Energy's Computer Incident Advisory Capability (CIAC), http://hoaxbusters.ciac.org/HoaxBustersHome.html. Use four functions on the homepage – Hoax Info, Hoax Categories, Hoax Index, or Search – to determine fact versus fiction. Get tips on how to recognize hoaxes and what to do about them.






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