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Practice Test



This activity contains 24 questions.

Question 1.
What is the ultimate goal of reading?

 
End of Question 1


Question 2.
After much debate, researchers have consistently found that systematic instruction in phonics is NOT an essential component of a balanced reading program.

   
 
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Question 3.
Which strategy can assist middle and high school students to improve their decoding of multisyllabic words?

 
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Question 4.

David, a fourth grade student, reads a second grade reading passage at 55 words correct per minute (WCPM) with 90 to 100% word recognition (Recall guidelines for WCPM for grades 2 through 5). Which strategy and which level of reading passage can his teacher use to help David improve his reading fluency?
 
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Question 5.
Ms. Rodriguez is using a strategy to help her students become actively engaged in comprehension before, during, and after reading in cooperative groups or pairs. The name of this strategy is:

 
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Question 6.
Mr. Garcia teaches fix-up strategies that students can use when their understanding breaks down. Which strategy is NOT a fix-up strategy?

 
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Question 7.

Ms. Rivera asks students to read lists of words and passages that are leveled by grade, and retell or answer comprehension questions about the passages they have read. She determines the independent, instructional, and frustration reading levels of the students, and she also gains insight into the decoding and comprehension strategies that the students use when reading. Ms. Rivera is using:
 
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Question 8.
Mr. Miller provides modeling on breaking "unbelievable" to "un-believe-able." Then, he tells students about the meaning of "un" (not) and "-able" (can be). What decoding strategy is he teaching?

 
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Question 9.
Research suggests that teachers should provide the direct instruction of several comprehension strategies in order to improve students' reading comprehension. Which strategy is NOT a recommended comprehension strategy?

 
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Question 10.
The instructional level is characterized by students' reading materials that are too difficult even with assistance.

   
 
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Question 11.
Curriculum-based measurement tends to focus on the product of reading and ignores salient factors that influence success or failure of literacy development.

   
 
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Question 12.
Identifying and creating word families (e.g., -it, sit, mit) have been one of the most consistent predictors of difficulties in learning to read, and children who struggle with these skills are likely to be among the poorest readers.

   
 
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Question 13.
Rhyming refers to identifying similarities and differences in word endings.

   
 
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Question 14.
The words on a Word Wall remain throughout the school year to make sure students master those words.

   
 
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Question 15.
Using knowledge of word structures such as compound words, root words, suffixes, or prefixes is called onset-rime.

   
 
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Question 16.
Sight Word Association Procedure (SWAP) is a strategy that helps students increase their sight vocabulary while working in cooperative groups to read a selection.

   
 
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Question 17.
Classwide peer tutoring is recommended to implement once a week over a period of 8 weeks to increase substantially students' fluency.

   
 
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Question 18.
The Question-Answer Relationships strategy (QAR) involves students in the reconstruction of stories they have read or heard.

   
 
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Question 19.
K-W-L is a three-step strategy to help students become actively engaged in comprehension before, during, and after reading.

   
 
End of Question 19


Question 20.



 
To create paragraphs in your essay response, type <p> at the beginning of the paragraph, and </p> at the end.

End of Question 20


Question 21.



 
To create paragraphs in your essay response, type <p> at the beginning of the paragraph, and </p> at the end.

End of Question 21


Question 22.



 
To create paragraphs in your essay response, type <p> at the beginning of the paragraph, and </p> at the end.

End of Question 22


Question 23.



 
To create paragraphs in your essay response, type <p> at the beginning of the paragraph, and </p> at the end.

End of Question 23


Question 24.
Mrs. Higgin’s seventh-grade student, Lawrence, is very creative and has interesting things to write about, but he has trouble putting sentences together to develop coherent, logical paragraphs. Which strategy can Mrs. Higgins use to assist him in paragraph writing?

 
End of Question 24





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