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Home  arrow Student Resources  arrow Chapter 12: The European Empires  arrow True/False Quiz

True/False Quiz



This activity contains 26 questions.

Question 1.
All sixteenth-century Europeans believed that the world was flat.


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Question 2.
Left a large surplus by his father, Henry VIII spent lavishly to restore England to European prominence.


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Question 3.
Because they had little to trade, Europeans paid for spices with bullion.


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Question 4.
The Portuguese ruler, Prince Henry the Navigator, studied navigational techniques, accumulated detailed accounts of voyages, and encouraged the creation of accurate maps of the African coastline.


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Question 5.
Vasco da Gama rounded Cape Fear and entered the Indian Ocean.


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Question 6.
Christopher Columbus was a Spaniard who convinced Isabella and Ferdinand to support voyages of discovery.


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Question 7.
Ferdinand Magellan died during the voyage around the world. His crew completed the trip without him.


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Question 8.
In thirty years the population of the Aztec Empire declined from 25 million to 2 million.


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Question 9.
The Dominican priest, Bartolomé de Las Casas, justified the enslavement of native populations.


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Question 10.
In the sixteenth century, the Mongol Empire remained unified with its capital in Asia.


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Question 11.
The largest and most developed states in the Holy Roman Empire were located in the western half of the Empire.


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Question 12.
The marriage of Ferdinand and Isabella resulted in the complete unification of the Aragon and Castile.


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Question 13.
Wales and Scotland were mountainous and had harsh climates that made agriculture difficult.


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Question 14.
European states uniformly forbade women from succeeding to thrones.


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Question 15.
Muscovy succeeded Constantinople as the capital of Eastern Orthodox Christianity.


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Question 16.
The boyars were originally powerful landlords of great estates who owed little to the tsars of Muscovy.


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Question 17.
Ivan the Terrible received his nickname from his attempts to crush the military service class of Muscovy.


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Question 18.
The unification of the Polish and Lithuanian crowns in 1569 also involved the decentralization of power and the strengthening of the rights of the nobility in both countries.


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Question 19.
The Wars of the Roses were fought over the claims of two cadet branches of the English royal family—the house of Lancaster and the Tudors.


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Question 20.
English landholders were among the most heavily taxed in Europe.


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Question 21.
Thomas Cromwell believed that careful management of Parliament would strengthen the monarchy in England.


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Question 22.
The duke of Burgundy was defeated first by the Swiss, not by the French.


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Question 23.
One of the strengths of the French monarchy was the well-established principle of taxation in France.


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Question 24.
One of the side-effects of the reconquista was anti-Semitism leading to the eventual expulsion of the Jews from Spain.


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Question 25.
Henry VIII of England was allied first with the Holy Roman Empire and then with France during the Italian Wars.


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Question 26.
The Treaty of Madrid finally ended the Italian Wars.


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